#26 ER and the use of the first language: An interview with Amanda Gillis-Furutaka

Last August we went to Kyoto Sangyo University to interview Professor Amanda Gillis-Furutaka. She has been teaching there for over twenty years, contributing to establish and maintain a large extensive reading programme at this university. Over the last few years, she has been carrying out qualitative research on the thought processes that occur when we do ER in a second or foreign language. In this episode, Professor Gillis-Furutaka tells us about some of the most interesting insights that she has obtained through her interviews with students of different ages and levels. Listen and learn about the various factors affecting graded reader readability besides the number of headwords, about the many ways in which the L1 is involved while reading in an L2, and about the interplay between working memory and the practice of extensive reading. 

Resources: 

In this 2012 article you can find information about the ER programme at Kyoto Sangyo University. 
http://erfoundation.org/proceedings/erwc1-Gillis-Furutaka.pdf

Here is an article that Professor Gillis-Furutaka wrote for the Journal of Extensive Reading that focuses on graded readers’ readability. 
http://jalt-publications.org/content/index.php/jer/article/view/7/1

And finally, here is her most recent article, which focuses on working memory and the use of the L1 by students doing ER. 
https://687a7f01-a-62cb3a1a-s-sites.googlegroups.com/site/neuroelt/publications-journals/1%20MindBrainEd%20Journal%20Vol%201%20May%202018.pdf

#25 Voices on future research on ER

We have dedicated our 25th episode to the future of ER research. There are so many things that we still don’t know about ER that it is not easy to decide where to start looking. In our case, we begun by seeking out the opinions of two long-time ER practitioners and advocates with extensive experience conducting research in this field: Rob Waring and Tom Robb. Both of them have already been on the podcast in the past, Professor Robb in episodes 3 and 4, and Professor Waring in episodes 21 and 22. From different perspectives, they suggest a myriad ways in which we can broaden our knowledge of everything that surrounds extensive reading.

In this article by Professor Waring he lists many questions concerning ER that remain unanswered today and that he discusses in the podcast.
http://www.robwaring.org/papers/various/assesser.html

Show Notes #24 An interview with Marcos Benevides

There are so many ways in which Tokyo Oberlin University Professor Marcos Benevides, our guest for our 24th episode, is connected with ER that it is hard to chose one to start with. For one thing, for the last six years he has been using extensive reading as part of an English programme for 2000 […]

#24: An interview with Marcos Benevides

There are so many ways in which Tokyo Oberlin University Professor Marcos Benevides, our guest for our 24th episode, is connected with ER that it is hard to chose one to start with. For one thing, for the last six years he has been using extensive reading as part of an English programme for 2,000 students that he coordinates at his university. Also, he is an author and editor of graded readers, and the founder of a very particular collection: Atama ii Books, which you can sample here [http://www.gtcpub.com/Class/atamaii/tada/2016se/content/page1.htm]. Finally, he has also experienced first-hand the effect of reading on successfully learning and acquiring a new language (he was born in Brazil and moved to Canada with his family when we has eleven years old). Professor Benevides tells us in detail about all these experiences in this interview.

#23: The symbiotic relationship between intentional vocabulary learning and ER: An interview with Charles Browne

I first saw Dr. Charles Browne a few months ago at JALT’s PanSIG in Tokyo. He was giving a talk in a room that was almost as packed as a Japanese train during rush hour. He was introducing ER Central, which is a website that he created with Rob Waring, where students and teachers can find a myriad ER-related resources, and he was glowing. You could tell that he was passionate about it. I immediately thought that we had to have him on the podcast. So I told Travis and we got in touch with him. We asked him if he would give us an interview and, to our delight, he said yes in no time. Our original idea was just to have him introduce his website to our audience, but the interview flowed in different directions and became something that I find even more interesting. Among many other things, it included a really nice section on what Dr. Browne calls a symbiotic relationship between extensive reading and intentional vocabulary learning, for example, by means of flashcards. 

Check out https://www.er-central.com/